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Frances 
Croke
1725 - 1812


Frances 
Croke
, 2nd dau. after her marriage to the Rev. Johnson, she was known as Begum Johnson. She was pregant in 1757. Obit. Bengal Obituary Mrs Frances Johnson - (The oldest British resident in Calcutta) Died on the 3rd february, at her late dwelling house, to the Northward of the Old Fort, Calcutta, the venerable Mrs. Frances johnson, in the 87th year of her age, the oldest British resident in Calcutta. this lady was the second daughter of edward Crook, Esq. of herefordshire, Govermnor of Fort St David, on the coast of coromandel, and was born on the 16th of April 1728. Mr. Crook, previously to his return from india, was offered the Government of fort St George but declined the appointment, on account of his age and infiorm health, and returned to his native country, where he was received with high respect by teh Court of Directors of the eat India Company. In 1738 Miss Frances Crook, in teh 13th year of her age, married Parry Purple Templer, esq. nephew to Mr. Braddyll, then Governor of Calcutta, by whom she had two children, both of whom died young. In about five years after her marriage, she was left a widow by the death of Mr. Templer. She married secondly, james Altham, Esq. a Civil Servant on the Bengal Establishment. This second marriage was of short duration; in twelve days after his marriage, Mr. Altham died of the small-pox. Mrs. Altham remained a widow for about two years, when she married william watts, esq., then senior Member of the Supreme Council, and subsequently appointed Governor of Calcutta; but at teh time his appointment reached India, he was on his return to England. In 1756, when calcutta was taken by Surej-ud-Dowlah, Mr. Watts was chief at Moorshedabad, and both he and Mrs. Watts were in that city at teh time of the surrender of Fort William. The Nabob, elated by his momentary success, threatened destruction to every British subject, amle and female. Mr. watts and his family were placed in custody at Moorshedabad, to await the arrival of the Nabob; but they were both favourites of the Begum, the mother of the nabob, and to her friendship they were both indebted for their preservation. On thsi occasion, Mrs. Watts was placed under the same roof with the ladies of the Nabob's Court, by whom she was treated with the utmost delicacy and respect. At the expiration of thirty-seven days, and while the Nabob still cvontinued in the vicinity of Calcutta, the Begum found a safe conveyance for Mrs. Watts, and sent her, under an escort, by water, to Chandernagor, where she was received with al;l possible hospitality and attention by M. Lauss, the French Governor. Her husband being still closely confined at Moorshedabad, Mrs. Watts addressed a memorial to her friend the begum, entreating her kind offices for the release of her husband. the begum possessed great ascendancy over her son, the Nabob, and at her intercession, he consented, though with great reluctance to teh release of Mr. Watts, who was thus safely restored to his family. Mrs. Watts had four children by her third husband, one of whom died in early infancy; with the other three, namely a boy and two girls, Mr. and Mrs. Watts, about the year 1760, returned to England, where the eldest girl, Amelia, a lady of great beauty and accomplishments, married the Right Honourable Charles jenkinson, afterwards Earl of LIverpool. The second daughter marrid George Poyntz Ricketts, Esq. formerly Governor of Barbadoes. Mr. watts died iN England; and the state of his affairs in India, requiring the presence of his widow, Mrs. Watts returned to bengal about the year 1769; and on the 1st June, 1774, she gave her hand to the Reverand William Johnson, principal chaplain to the Presidency of Fort William, who returned to England in a few years after his marriage, and Mrs Johnson continued ever since to reside in calcutta, in a style of dignified hospitality. her manners were cheerful polished and hhighly pleasing. She abounded in anecdote; and possessing ease and affability of communication, her conversation was always interesting, without any tendency to fatigue the hearer. She had a strong understanding, to which she superadded much and accurate observation. Her views of life were correct, and the benevolence of her heart and the warmth of her affections continued unimpaired to the latest period of her life. Though prone to reflect and to discriminate, yet her jusdgment did not abridge, but served to guide and exalt her benevolence. As a Christian, she was sound in her principles, and exemplified in her practioce; - in fine, her conduct in all the relations of life was such as to gain the universal respect and esteem of society. She continued to enjoy excellent health till a few weeks before her dissolution. her remains were interred on Tuesday morning in teh ground belonging to ST. John's Church, where a spot ogf ground for a cemetery had been allotted for trye deceased during the Government of Lord Wellesley, northward of the Monument erected over the grave of Admiral Watson, N.W. anlge of the Church yard. the funeral was attended by a numerous company, among whom were the Right Honourable the Governor general, in the state coach with six horses, and a detachment of the body guard; The Honourable Sir Henry Russell, the Honouyrable John Lumsden, esq., etc, etc. the monument over her grave still remains standing and bears the following inscription: - Beneath are deposited the remains of Mrs. Frances Johnson; she was tehs econd daughter of Edward Crook, Esq.Govermnor of Fort St. David, on teh coast of Cormandel, and was born the 10th April, 1725. In 1738, she intermarried with Parry Purple Templer, esq., newphew of Mr. Braddyll, then Governor of Calcutta, by whom she had two children, who died infants. Her second husband was James Altham, of Calcutta Esq. who died of the small-pox a few days after the marriage. She next intermarried with William Watts, Esq. then Senior Member of the Supreme Council of Bengal, by whom she had issue four children, Amelia, who married the Right Honourable CXharles Jenkinson, afterwards earl of Liverpool, by whom she had issue, on child, Robert Banks, now earl of Liverpool, etc etc Edward, now of Hanslope Park, in the county of Bucks, Esq. Sophia late the wife and now the Widow of George Poyntz Ricketts, esq. late Governor of Barbadoes, and William, who died an infant. After the daeth of R. Watts, she in 1774, intermarried with the Reverend William johnson, then principal chaplain to the Presidency of Fort William, by whom she had no issue. She died the 3rd february, 1812. Aged 87, the oldest British resident in Benga, universally beloved, respected and revered.

Born: 10th Apr 1725Baptised:
Died: 3rd Feb 1812Buried: Calcutta, India Feb 1812
Family:
Croke

Ancestors
[ Patrilineage | Matrilineage | Earliest Ancestors | Force | Force2 | Options ]

1.
Frances 
Croke
(
Templer
,
Altham
,
Watts
,
Johnson
) 1725 - 1812
2.
Edward 
Croke
+ post 1725
 

Siblings


1.
F/? 
Croke
* ante 1725

Spouses



1. 1738
2. post 1747
James 
Altham
(
Croke
) + post 1747

3. Calcutta, India 24th Mar 1749
4. 1774

Descendants
[ Options ]

a.
1.
U/? 
Templer
* post 1738
2.
U/? 
Templer
* post 1738
b.
3.
Amelia 
Watts
(
Jenkinson
) post 1748 - 1770
3a.
Sir Charles 
Jenkinson
(
Watts
,
Bisshopp
) 1727 - 1808
3.1.
Robert Bankes 
Jenkinson
(
Hervey
,
Chester-Bagot
) 1770 - 1828
4.
Edward 
Watts
post 1748 - post 1812
5.
William 
Watts
* post 1748
6.
Sophia 
Watts
(
Ricketts
) 1755 - 1830
6a.
George Poyntz 
Ricketts
(
Watts
) 1749 - 1800
6.1.
Rev. Frederick 
Ricketts
6.2.
Isabella 
Ricketts
(
Batson
) ...
6.3.
George Poyntz 
Ricketts
(
Pierce
) 1774 - 1815 ...
6.4.
Charles Milner 
Ricketts
(
?
) 1776 - 1867 ...
6.5.
Mordaunt 
Ricketts
c. 1827 - 1857
Sources

  • Family Archivists: see
    Croke


Timeline


10th Apr 1725Born
1738Married
post 1747Married
James 
Altham
(
Croke
) + post 1747
24th Mar 1749Married Calcutta, India
1774Married
3rd Feb 1812Died
Feb 1812Buried Calcutta, India
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