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Vernon 
Lushington
1832 - 1912


Vernon 
Lushington
, Q.C., of Pyports, Surrey, Secretary to the Admiralty, 1869 to 1877, judge of the County Courts for Surrey and Berks. (1877-) County Court Judge (1891). Retired County Court Judge (1911). Venn's entry reads: Lushington, Vernon. College: TRINITY Entered: Lent, 1852 Born: Died: Jan. 24, 1912 Adm. pens. (age 19) at TRINITY, Jan. 17, 1852. (4th] s. of (The Rt. Hon.] Stephen (Christ Church, Oxford, 1797) (Judge of the Admiralty Court and Master of the Bench of the Inner Temple] (and Grace, dau. of Thomas Wilson Carr, of Hampstead). B. Mar. 8, 1832, in London. Matric. Lent, 1852; Scholar, 1854; (Civil Law Classes, 1st Class, 1854-5); LL.B. 1859; LL.M. 1885. President of the Union, 1854. Adm. at the Inner Temple, Mar. 15, 1852. Called to the Bar, Jan. 26, 1857. Deputy Judge Advocate-General, 1864-9. Q.C., 1868. Bencher, 1869. Secretary to the Admiralty, 1869-77. Judge of County Courts (Surrey and Berks.) 1877-1900. Married, Feb. 28, 1865, Jane, dau. of Francis Mowatt, M.P., and had issue. Author, Reports of Cases decided in Admiralty Court and on appeal to the Privy Council. Of Kingsley, Bordon, Hants. Died Jan. 24, 1912. (Scott, MSS.; Law Lists; Foster, Men at the Bar; Inns of Court; Burke, P. and B.; Who was Who.) From The Cork Examiner, 18 January 1864 - INFRINGEMENT OF THE FOREIGN ENLISTMENT ACT. ----------------- Yesterday, before Mr, Raffles, the Liverpool stipendiary magistrate, a charge of having infringed the Foreign Enlistment Act was preferred against Mr. Thomas Highat, a member of the firm of Jones and Co., ship-store dealers and chandlers, of Chapel- street, Liverpool. The summons included the named [sic] of John Jones (principal,) and John Welding (a clerk to the firm), but they did not appear. The facts of the case, as stated by Mr. Vernon Lushington, were as follows :--In 1863 a vessel, called the Japan, was built at Dumbarton. Mr. Thomas Bold, a partner in the firm of Jones and Co., was the sole registered owner of the ship until the 23rd of June, when Mr. Bold informed the Customs that he had sold her to a foreigner. Towards the end of March the vessel was nearly ready for sea, and it was then necessary to obtain a crew. This was done, partly at Greenock and partly at Liverpool. At Liverpool several persons were induced to sign articles for a voyage in the Japan to Singapore and back for two years. The men were directed to take their clothes to the office of Jones and Co., and there they got their advance notes, and in one case money was paid by the defendant. The men, including John Stanley, Benjamin Conolly, and Francis Glazebrook, went on board the Greenock boat (where they saw Mr. Jones and Mr. Highat), and each man having answered to his name, they sailed to Greenock and went on board the Japan. On the 3d of April the Japan sailed from the Clyde under the guise of a "trial trip," went down the channel, and towards the coast of France. At a little from Brest they fell in with a small steamer, which they towed into Brest Harbour. There a number of boxes were sent on board the Japan from the small steamer, containing arms and ammunition, and shortly afterwards Mr. Jones himself came on board, and superintended the transhipment of these articles. Lieutenant Maury also came on board the Japan, and took the command, assuming the grey uniform of the Confederate navy, and telling the men that the vessel was about to become a Confederate ship of war. He promised the men £10 bounty and £4 10s. per month if they would enlist. Mr. Jones was there during the whole time, and was actively engaged in inducing the men to volunteer for the Confederate service. The volunteers afterwards went into the cabin. Benjamin Conolly, the first witness called, said he shipped in March last, at the Liverpool Sailors' Home, for the Japan steamer. After describing how he sailed on "the trial trip" he told what happened at Brest. They there commenced taking in guns and ammunition from the steamer, in which Mr. Jones took a "clever part." Captain Maury came on board next day, and put on the grey uniform of the Confederate navy and said he was about to hoist the Confederate flag. He told the men they would have a good ship, and that he would make them all very comfortable. He then read his commission. Connolly [sic] said he did not want to go, but Mr. Jones endeavoured to induce him by telling him he would make plenty of money. Still he refused though he did afterwards sign an agreement to sail, and received £10 bounty from the purser. Mr. Jones was there then, and got £9 from him, again promising to send it to his parents. Numbers of others signed papers also. They were to have £4 10s. per month. Mr. Jones promised that all the men would get prize money. They hoisted the Confederate flag the same evening amidst the cheers of the crew, and sailed. They soon afterwards met with several Federal ships, some of which were burnt. They returned to France about two months ago, and ported at Cherbourg. He obtained leave of absence to come to Liverpool. At Jones's office he saw Jones and Highat. Mr. Jones did not seem to know him ; so he said "You knew me well enough in France, when you wanted me to serve under a foreign flag for you." Jones said, "Don't make a noise, there will be something done for you." This Mr. Highat must have heard, for he was sitting at a desk close by, and to him he then spoke, and showed his "citizen paper." Highat then said, "Ah, this is Maury's writing ; call again ; we will send a telegram to the ship about you." He saw Mr. Highat once or twice afterwards, and he told him to gather all the men belonging to the Georgia, and put them on board the Havre boat. He received £3 at Mr. Jones's office to pay his expenses, but he became afraid of breaking the Queen's proclamation by going on board the Georgia again, and so he ran away with the £3. There was more than that due to him for his service on board the Georgia. In cross-examination by Mr. Deighton (who appeared for Highat) the evidence of Conolly was not materially affected. He admitted that he was now with Stanley, Glazebrook, and other men who had been in the Georgia, in the service of Mr. M'Guire (a private detective officer in the pay of the United States consul, at Liverpool), and that he received excellent pay for picking up information. He denied that he had solicited Mr. Highat for employment in the Confederate service, and that Mr. Highat said it was illegal. He admitted that on one occasion Mr. Jones advised him not to join a Confederate ship. When he went to the office of Jones and Co., on the Georgia's returning to France, his object was to get money to enable him to get back to Cherburg and get the wages which were due him from Capt. Maury. After the examination of some other witnesses in corroboration of Conolly, the defendant was committed to the assizes, bail being received, himself in £300, and two sureties in £150 each. Memorials of Old Haileybury College No. 974 Surname Lushington Christian Names Vernon Dates at Haileybury 1850-51 1st Term Law, Sanskrit Prizes 2nd Term Classics, Law, Hist & Pol Econ, Sanskrit, Hindi, General Proficiency at Easter Prizes 3rd Term Law, Sanskrit Prizes Presidency [Bengal] Other notes [no other information - record may be faulty]

Born: Middlesex, England 8th Mar 1832 Baptised:
Died: , , , England 24th Jan 1912 Buried:
Family:
Lushington

Ancestors
[ Patrilineage | Matrilineage | Earliest Ancestors | Force | Force2 | Options ]

1.
Vernon 
Lushington
(
Mowatt
) 1832 - 1912
2.
Rt.Hon.Dr. Stephen 
Lushington
(
Carr
) 1782 - 1873
4.
Sir Stephen 
Lushington
(
Boldero
) 1744 - 1807
5.
Hester/Esther 
Boldero
(
Lushington
) c. 1753 - 1830
3.
Sarah Grace 
Carr
(
Lushington
) 1794 - 1837
6.
Thomas Wilson 
Carr
1770 - 1829
 

Siblings


1.
Edward Harbord 
Lushington
(
Ramsay
) 1822 - 1904
2.
Stephen 
Lushington
post 1822 - 1860
3.
William Bryan 
Lushington
(
Godwin-Austen
) 1825 - post 1881
4.
Frances 
Lushington
1828 - post 1881
5.
Alice 
Lushingon
c. 1830 - 1903
6.
Laura 
Lushington
* c. 1831
7.
Edith Grace 
Lushington
(
Norris
) c. 1832 - post 1858
8.
Godfrey 
Lushington
(
Smith
) 1832 - 1907
9.
Hestor 
Lushington
(
Russell
) + post 1844

Spouses



1. St Margaret's, Westminster, , , , England 28th Feb 1865
Jane 
Mowatt
(
Lushington
) 1836 - 1884

Descendants
[ Options ]

a.
Jane 
Mowatt
(
Lushington
) 1836 - 1884
1.
Katherine 
Lushington
(
Maxse
) 1868 - 1922
2.
Margaret 
Lushington
(
Massingberd
) 1869 - 1906
3.
Susan 
Lushington
1870 - 1953
Sources

Census

Timeline


8th Mar 1832Born Middlesex, England
28th Feb 1865Married
Jane 
Mowatt
(
Lushington
) 1836 - 1884 England
1871Head of household in 1871 census (census) England
3rd Apr 1881Head of household in 1881 census (census) England
1891Head of household in 1891 census (census) England
1911_C1911/ROLE BOARDER Brighton, Sussex, England
24th Jan 1912Died England
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