< A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z >
Edward (Ted) Taylor 
Scott
1883 - 1932


Edward (Ted) Taylor 
Scott
, editor of The Guardian Jan-Apr 1932. 18. Jean Margaret SCOTT was born on 20/9/1911 in Frognal Mansions, Hampstead, London, England and died before 2000. ***************************** Jean married John COMYNS CARR, son of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ____________. John died before 2000. ***************************** Children from this marriage were: F i. Sophie COMYNS CARR. Sophie married ??_________. ***************************** F ii. Jenny COMYNS CARR. ***************************** 19. Richard Farquhar SCOTT was born on 16/5/1914. ***************************** General Notes: Educated Gresham's School, Holt; Christs Collee, Cambridge, 3rd Cl. Hons in English, 2nd Cl. Hons in Economics. 1936 : League of Nations Union 1937 : The Spectator 1939-47 : Foreign Office 1947 : Manchester Guardian, Diplomatic Correspondent 1963 : The Guardian, Washington Correspondent 1971 : The Guardian, Paris Correspondent 1974 : retired from The Guardian Trustee, The Scott Trust, 1948-84, chairman 1956-84 ***************************** Richard married Ruth BLUETT-DUNCAN, daughter of ____________ ____________ and ____________ *****************************____________. The child from this marriage was: M i. David Charles SCOTT. David married Jennifer CLAPP, daughter of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ____________. David next married Edith RODEN, daughter of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ____________. ***************************** Richard next married Anne WALMSLEY, daughter of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ____________. ***************************** The child from this marriage was: F i. Tamara Anne SCOTT. Tamara married Jean Philippe BROCHES, son of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ____________. ***************************** Richard next married Christiane PERON, daughter of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ____________, in 1990. 20. Rosalind Katherine SCOTT was born on 25/9/1917. ***************************** Rosalind married Peter RALEIGH, son of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ____________. Peter died before 2000. ***************************** Children from this marriage were: M i. Christopher RALEIGH died before 2000. Christopher married Veena SONI, daughter of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ***************************** M ii. Stephen RALEIGH. Stephen married Muriel BAINBRIDGE, daughter of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ____________. ***************************** 21. Edward John SCOTT was born on 28/10/1924. Edward married Letje [--?--], daughter of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ____________. ***************************** Children from this marriage were: M i. Charles SCOTT. Charles married Sandra PIGEON, daughter of ____________ ____________ and ____________ ____________ ***************************** F ii. Catherine SCOTT. ***************************** F iii. Claire SCOTT. ***************************** Don Montague wrote: General Notes: Educated Rugby School 1897-1901, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 1902-3 and London School of Economics (BSc Econ). Private Secretary and ADC to Sir Sydney Olivier, Governor of Jamaica, 1907-9. Financial Journalism 1909-11. Manchester Guardian 1911-32, Editor 1929-32. Enlisted 11 March 1915, Lieutenant RFA, France, POW 1918, Demobilised January 1919. ************************** The new Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004) records: "Edward Taylor Scott (1883-1932), by Francis Dodd, 1920s Scott, Edward Taylor (1883-1932), journalist, was born on 15 November 1883 at The Firs, Whitworth Lane, Rusholme, Manchester, the third and last son of Charles Prestwich Scott (1846-1932), editor and owner of the Manchester Guardian, and his wife, Rachel Susan Cook [see Scott, Rachel Susan (1848-1905); the name Taylor acknowledged the Scotts' cousins, co-founders of the paper. He was educated at Rugby School and then at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, but left without a degree to study economics at the then new London School of Economics; in London he boarded with the family of the anti-imperialist writer John Atkinson Hobson. Again he left (in 1906) without a degree to become private secretary to Sydney Olivier, the Fabian socialist and newly appointed governor of Jamaica, but almost at once (1907) achieved a London BSc (Econ.) degree as an external student. Before going to Jamaica he married on 5 September 1907 Mabel Josephine Hobson (1886–1969), J. A. Hobson's daughter; they had four children. After two years (1907–9) in Jamaica, where he and his wife were intimate friends with the Olivier family, Scott became a financial journalist in the City office of the London Daily News; in 1913 he moved to Manchester as commercial editor of his father's newspaper. Early in 1915 he joined the Royal Field Artillery; taken prisoner in the German offensive of March 1918 and held at St Quentin, he was long posted missing, but was home by Christmas. His experiences in the First World War affected him deeply: during the 1919–21 period of labour unrest, when he was in charge of economic and social topics, his leaders `always show a sympathy with men who might well have been gunners in his battery a year before. His views about cabinet ministers, company directors and trade union bosses often resemble a front line soldier's opinion of the staff' (Ayerst, 432). Because foreign affairs in the 1920s so often turned on economics and finance—as over German inflation and reparations—Scott's expertise made him in effect the paper's chief foreign as well as home leader writer. He was now also its part proprietor: in 1914 his father had divided the bulk of his shares among his two surviving sons and his son-in-law, C. E. Montague. The elder brother, John Scott, kept to the management side; in 1925 Montague deliberately left the editorial staff to make room for Ted Scott, as he was known. In 1929 C. P. Scott formally retired and Ted became editor. The octogenarian father, however, as `governing director' still came to the office every day and exerted an influence the son could not withstand. Scott achieved full autonomy only on his father's death on 1 January 1932, and then could exert it only for a few months. His colleague and devoted friend Malcolm Muggeridge later made the harassing father–son relationship the theme of a novel, Picture Palace (1934); the Manchester Guardian, however, got the publisher to withdraw it. In the 1920s Scott broadened the paper's economic and financial coverage, launching the Manchester Guardian Commercial (later discontinued) and Manchester Guardian Weekly. The policy he followed was shaped both by his own radical, independent temperament and by the stress of the two great crises he lived through, the post-war boom and slump and the world depression that started in 1929. `One can hardly doubt', he wrote in one leader, `that [selfgovernment in industry] will come, and resistance to it may be futile' (Manchester Guardian, 23 June 1921); in another, that to keep productive workers unemployed was `the economics of the madhouse' (ibid., 23 Nov 1921; Ayerst, 432) . He guided the paper in opposition to the 1926 general strike but also to parts of the Emergency Powers Act. In 1931 he led it gradually away from approval of the National Government (which, in his absence on holiday, his deputy W. P. Crozier had welcomed), criticizing its conduct of the election campaign and opposing the uniform cut in unemployment benefit; this led many business firms to cancel advertising—a severe loss of revenue. By 16 November 1931 he was writing to J. L. Hammond: "it seems to me broadly that politics are getting into an ugly shape and that we shall be driven more and more to take an anti-property line. And that is fatal to a twopenny paper. I myself feel that I am getting more and more of a socialistic way of thinking (or rather feeling) but the more I look at the Socialist party the less I like it. (Ayerst, 471) In overseas matters he shared the paper's sympathy with Weimar Germany and its suspicion of colonialism. Where Scott might have led his `twopenny paper' is unknowable: on 22 April 1932 he took his son Richard to Windermere for a boating weekend; while they were on the water, very cold at that season, a freak squall capsized the boat. Richard got on top. Scott tried to swim ashore, but the cold brought a seizure; he sank and drowned. His remains were cremated four days later at Manchester crematorium. Scott cared more for ideas and argument than for style. A dark, well-built, handsome man of great charm, he was `so reserved and so modest that the toughness of his mind and the independence of his character escaped the negligent eye. He was of all men the most sincere and the least prejudiced' (Martin, 186). He had started to innovate and, in newspaper history, remains a great might-have-been. John Rosselli Sources : D. Ayerst, Guardian: biography of a newspaper (1971); K. Martin, Father figures (1966);Manchester Guardian (23 April 1932); The Times (23 April 1932);T he Times (26 April 1932); WWW; C. H. Rolph, Kingsley: the life, letters and diaries of Kingsley Martin (1973); I. Hunter, Malcolm Muggeridge (1980); F. R. Gannon, The British press and Germany, 1936–1939 (1971); The political diaries of C. P. Scott, 1911–1928, ed. T. Wilson (1970); private information (2004) [assistant archivist, Special Collections, U. Lond. Library]; CGPLA Eng. & Wales (1932);birth cert.; marriage cert.; death cert. Archives : JRL, archives of the Manchester Guardian; BLPES, letters to Edwin Cannan; Bodl. Oxf., letters to J. L. L. B. Hammond and B. L. Hammond Likenesses : F. Dodd, oils, 1920, priv. coll.; F. Dodd, pencil drawing, 1920–29, The Guardian, London [see illus.]; F. S. Schmidt, photograph, c.1930, priv. coll.; repro. in Manchester Guardian. {Wealth at death : £27,856 6s. 10d.: probate, 28 May 1932, CGPLA Eng. & Wales} ***************************** Noted events in his life were: • He worked as a Journalist and Editor, the Manchester Guardian. • He was educated at Rugby School; Corpus Christi College, Oxford; London School of Economics.36

Born: The Firs, Fallowfield, Higher Broughton, Lancs., , England 15th Nov 1883 Baptised:
Died: Lake Windermere, Apr 1932Buried:
Family:
Scott

Ancestors
[ Patrilineage | Matrilineage | Earliest Ancestors | Force | Force2 | Options ]

1.
Edward (Ted) Taylor 
Scott
(
Hobson
) 1883 - 1932
2.
Charles Prestwich 
Scott
(
Cook
) 1846 - 1932
4.
Russell 
Scott
(
Prestwich
) 1801 - 1880
5.
Isabella Civil 
Prestwich
(
Scott
) 1813 - post 1846
3.
Rachel Susan 
Cook
(
Scott
) 1848 - 1905
6.
Rev. John 
Cook
(
Farquhar
) 1807 - 1869
7.
Rachel Susan 
Farquhar
(
Cook
) 1812 - post 1894

Siblings


1.
Madeline (Madie) 
Scott
(
Montague
) 1876 - 1958
2.
Laurence Prestwich 
Scott
1877 - 1908
3.
hidden


Spouses



1. 5th Sep 1907
Mabel Josephine 
Hobson
(
Scott
) 1886 - 1969

Descendants
[ Options ]

a.
Mabel Josephine 
Hobson
(
Scott
) 1886 - 1969
1.
Jean Margaret 
Scott
(
Comyns Carr
) 1911 - ante 2000
2.
Richard Farquhar 
Scott
(
Bluett Duncan
,
Walmesley
,
hidden
) 1914 - 2011
2a.
2.1.
David 
Scott
c. 1940 - ante 2011
2b.
Anna 
Walmesley
(
Scott
)
2.2.
Tamara 
Scott
* c. 1963
Sources

  • Family Archivists: see
    Scott


Timeline


15th Nov 1883Born Higher Broughton, Lancs., England
5th Sep 1907Married
Mabel Josephine 
Hobson
(
Scott
) 1886 - 1969
Apr 1932Died
| Top |

Hosted by
HTML generated by
SoftLinks
, copyright © 1996 - 2017 Ben Laurie
Copyright © 1996 - 2017 Camilla von Massenbach