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John Edward 
Wallis
1821 - 1888


John Edward 
Wallis
, of Alexandria, Egypt, formerly of London, Judge of "The International Court of Instance", i.e. "Mixed Tribunals" Cairo (apptd. 01 Dec 1881), H.M. Vice-Consul, Cairo (16 Jun 1874) and at Port Said (01 Oct 1879), in Egypt, Propr. of "The Tablet" (inherited from his father, sold 1868), & its Editor (1856-74), "as a leading Roman Catholic, a strong Tory, detesting converts, Irishmen & Dr Manning, opposed (even) the Disestablishment of the Irish (Anglican) Church", educ. Prior Park, London Univ. (1842), admitted as a student member of the Inner Temple on 9th December 1841, Bonn Univ. (1844) (befriending there William Heine who had attended the university there 1819-20, the later eminent German Poet, whose "Book of Songs" he was first to translate into English [pub. 1856), & Inner Temple (called to the Bar, 29 Jan 1847), etc. Witnesses at his baptism were Cuthbert Watson and Anna Brown. Modern English biography / Boase, F.. - A facsimile of he Truro, 1892-1921 ed (6 vols) barrister of Law in practice (1871). the 1851 census records him at 55 Mount Pleasant in Liverpool, barrister in practice, visiting, staying with Martha Evans (housekeeper) and daus. porbably actually visiting his sister, Lucy who was a nun. The 1861 census recorded him as Editor newspaper, barrister not in practice. "Landowners in Co. Galway, circa 1870s: J. E. Wallis, address Beaufort-square, London, owned 426 acres." 1850 Publication of "Reports of Cases in the Superior Courts on the laws and practises of the New County Courts" by William Roberts, Henry Leeming and John Edward Wallis. "in response to your request on information regarding your great-grandfather Johann Eduard Wallis, I am able to verify the following details: According to our inscription records ('Immatrikulationalbum'), under number 210 of 1838 a certain Johann Eduard Wallis, born in York, was enrolled for philosophy on November 9, 1838, at the age of 17. The date of birth was not recorded in those times. His father was a physician. He had his 'ZXugnis der Reife' from a school in Bath. His living quarters here in Bonn were located at the Sternstrasse 313, which is in the centre of the city. Unfortunately, I haven't found the certificate of his studies ('Exmatrikulationskunde') which have been destroyed by the bombardment of the main university building during WWII. I hope these informations etc. etc. Klaus Borchard" "London Evening Standard 14 July 1842 University of London, Somerset House Matriculation Pass examination, July, 1842 .... Second division .... John Edward Wallis, University" "Morning Post 30 January 1847 CALLS to the Bar - The undermentioned gentlemen were cvalled to the Bar by the society of the Inner Temple, yesterday - ..John Edward Wallis, Esq." London Metropolitan Archives MIDDLESEX DEEDS Catalogue Ref.?MD Property Records FILE-?Assignment of lease. 1. John Wallis of Grays Inn Place [St. Andrew Holborn], gent. 2. George Glover of Goodge Street [St. Pancras] druggist. - ref.ACC/0240/024 - date: 1859 National Probate Calendar 1888 Wills and Admons WAL-WAR 32/103 p.433 Wallis John Edward 16 February 1888 Personal estate £486 Adminstration of the personal estate of John Edward Wallis late at Alexandria was granted at the Principal Registry to John Edward Power Wallis of 1 Garden Court Temple in the County of Middlesex Esquire Barrister-at-Law the son and one of the next of kin. He wrote a diary: Dicky Wallis has tried transcribing it and this is the results of his progress so far: John Edward Wallis, Journal of JE Wallis, Burton on Grange. August 28, 1838. Tuesday. I rose at 5 this eventful day, took a cup of coffee and bade farewell. The parting, it may be easily conceived, was mournful. Those who staid (sic) were losing both their parents and brother each for an unusually long time. Of course many tears were shed and many keepsakes exchanged. Often did we part and again return to bid the last farewell. We separated and the Almighty alone knows when we shall meet again. Mamma supported it much more firmly than I had expected. Papa was nervous before we left the house but soon recovered his equanimity. There was little said at the wharf. I heard a whinny and beheld poor Windsor whom they had put into a light cart to bring the luggage. It was, I own, an additional pang to part with the faithful animal from which I had derived so much amusement and to which I was become attached, but I hope and trust he will have a master no less kind than I have been. We started at 12 minutes after 7 and were detained of an hour in Naburn lock. The steam boat was lay aground and being the full length of the lock, the gate could not be opened. Selby was passed merrily. Two coaches had seemed waiting for passengers. The back road from Leeds had brought many passengers. We enjoyed a substantial breakfast at 11 of ham. The river began to widen and long before the junction of the Trent had assumed a respectable appearance. The navigation is, I understand, difficult on account of a number of sandbanks which vary their position. The weather was fine the heat by no means offensive, nor were the paasengers disagreeably numerous. The steamboat has the advantage of being able to follow in spite of the wind any track where there may be most water. G Lambert met us at Hull. We had been recommended by Mrs. Watson to Walkingham. So, freeing ourselves from the inopportunities of the porters we entrusted our baggage to one and found two rooms vacant. Sinclair and I hung out in one. After dining with G and P Lambert, we set out for passports from the Dutch consul. We found his clerk after much searching the time being office hours being long over. No passports for Belgium could be given on account of recent instructions so we got ours for Munich and R Sinclairs for Wiesbaden. 10 s(hillings) each. The clerk had known G. Wallis many years ago. Papa and G. Lambert went to find the Belgian one returned. The rain surprised us, accompanied by loud thunder and lightning which terrified Mamma very much. We lost our way; had to enquire for it again every minute. Mamma's nervousness passed all bounds and Sinclair and self got the effects in a good scolding. It was nearly dark; the rain fell in torrents and she insisted on our knocking at every other door. At length, we reached the longed for haven. Tea waited (?) with great expectation. Papa & Mamma went home in a fly. Sinclair, Percival and I walked. They smoked. The conversation was not edifying and I did not understand Percival's object. He seemed to be persecuting\ridiculing(?) Sinclair. Poor silly Bob, a strange being and though yet much deserving pity. Never, as he said, had he known the influence of a mother's care nor the benefits of paternal direction. Well, tis time to sleep. Tuesday, August 28, 1838 Here we are, confound them, prettily imposed upon. We left York on the Tuesday because we heard from the office that 11 on Wednesday was the starting time. Twas altered to one, then to 4, then to 6, then to 9 . We come on board. They drop down half a mile and anchor. I am really in an unreasonable rage at it, but it's provoking. A whole day's bother and expense might have been spared. We shall not leave till 4 a.m. tomorrow, just 17 hours behind the time. We rose at 7 after a tremendous night. The rain, wind, thunder and lightning combined their efforts to disturb us, not without success. G and P Lambert breakfasted with us. After which we went out perambulated the town, enquired at the steam office, visited the Botanical gardens, which are very nice but just the same as any other Botanical gardens. On the road, I saw H. Astrop. I had intended to visit him so went with him home. The house is comfortable. His mother a very homely dame. I invited him to dinner and he came with me to the Botanical. Called on Mr Renver, a gentlemanly man with a nice house and chapel, burdened, I hear, with debt. Good books. Whence home. We dined at half past four. Papa and Mamma, H Astrop, P Lambert and George. The dinner was good, but very badly served indeed. Mrs. Wilson, Sir J. Egan's sister, has very bad taste on Hull is very far behind every place in the country. After dinner, a very warm discussion between Mamma and Percy Lambert. After talking a long time, I tried to show both that neither knew what the other was talking about. They found out that both agreed in denouncing the violators of the ninth commandment and joined issue upon the soundness of the motives which induce the majority of young men to enter the church. Then P Lambert and I fell out as to where we were to look for the true church. He gave up and we split again as to the grounds on which Protestants receive the Bible as the inspired word of God containing all (underlined) that is necessary to salvation. Having at least silenced, if not convinced, my antagonist, we changed the subject. I went out and bought a cap for four shillings then went and saw the luggage put on, parted with Harry and came on board. We watched the doings of the crew with mighty interest as they bustled mysteriously about. Papa with an awful shake of the head told us he felt persuaded we should not move for the night. This was resisted by the doughty Sinclair who vowed he would not leave the deck till we started. I ascertained the melancholy truth of Papa's fears and wishing him a pleasant watch upon deck till next morning at four, I withdrew to the cabin and saw the poor fellow sneak in too 10 minutes after. Now I'm about to pay my uncle a visit and then to bed. Just now a party of foreigners were sitting at the cabin table on the stuffed hair benches, chatting quietly to the steward (?) running in to say the ladies request that the disturbance may cease. Upon my word, Ladies, you push it far. All round me are either sleeping or disposing themselves for it. Sinclair has lost his cloak. This worthy has been very ridiculous and Papa very bantersome upon a design he had of purchasing a hammock. I begin to laugh and have roused him. Dear me, I must defer the relation I intended to give of his peculiarities for were I to begin the explosions of my laughter would awaken the whole crew. Friday night August 31, 1838 We started in earnest at four. At 6, feeling a call, I rose and on entering the cabin was greeted with most outrageous hoots of merriment from R. Sinclair who found my whole face too ridiculous. Though scarce able to stand the shaking had so stirred up my bile that I contemplated making an assault upon him on the spot but was forced to hurry on. When I returned from my throne, he was roaringly sick and I own I felt a demoniacal satisfaction that Nemesis had so soon overtaken him. Very ill I was and lay on one of the side sophas of the cabin. I soon learned that absolute tranquility was the only plan each movement, however trifling, brought on a new attack. Sinclair was very bad. He roared terribly and vociferated for brandy and water, tea, lemonade, ginger beer, cider, biscuits, soda water etc. in an astounding manner. Papa kept coming down occasionally to see us but was unable to keep his legs so always ran up again. We got into smooth water at 7 this morning when the sickness left me. The sea had been really rough that is there was a great swell after the storm. I enjoyed the voyage at the end. Mamma commenced to be sick at one this morning and was well by eight. Papa had felt very squeamish, but he forced himself to eat some dinner and was well. In the cabin at night a tremendous sea struck the ship. Everything was overturned. Papa fell off onto the floor. We breakfasted and met on deck. Mamma had made some female acquaintances, the two Miss Rawsons and Mrs. Rennie, the betrothed of Blackburn at whose cause I was present. We became very sociable and chatty. A fine apple was handed us by the Miss Rawsons and it was delicious. We arrived at Rotterdam at half past three. The heavy swell had prevented our making the usual course and had delayed us by two hours. We came to the Bath Hotel after having some anxiety about the porters whom we had paid three shillings. Dined at the Table d'hote. Mrs. Rennie and brother will join us up the Rhine. Sinclair is very short of cash. Johannes Brook has not given him enough money. Papa will advance him none. Papa made me a present of two books, Handbooks of Germany North and South, price 20 s(hillings). After dinner, I wrote a few lines home. We then walked out. I was much pleased with all I saw. The appearance of Rotterdam is most peculiar. The houses very high and wondrously clean with little mirrors at the sides of the windows in order that the drawing room sitters may see everything that passes. Each street has a canal up the middle crowded with shipping with drawbridges at intervals. The horses seem of a peculiar breed and are curiously shod with spikes from the end of their shoes to strengthen their stepping, they elevate their legs in walking quite strikingly. Then at every other house is a fat Dutch maid with short petticoats cleaning and washing furiously. Altogether it is very striking to a stranger. Rotterdam is fully what I had pictured to myself a Dutch town would be. There is some annual with a story about the Devil having a smoking match with a Dutchman in the town of Dort which gave ... (End of entries in ink, which overwrite earlier writing in pencil. The rest of the diary is entirely in pencil) ------------- The Times Friday 18th October 1861 page 10. Letter "The Pope's Allocution" corrects various things in a previous article by someone. See The Life of Cardinal Vaughan Part One (and Part two) by J.G. Snead Cox. ------------ The Times, Saturday, Jan 30, 1847; pg. 6; Issue 19460; col B INTER TEMPLE, Jan. 29.-The undermentioned Category: News Inner temple Jan 29.... calls to the bar... today.... John Edward Wallis.. ------------ Morning Post 27 June 1874 From the London Gazette of yesterday Foreign Office June 16 The Queen has been graciously pleased to appoint John Edward Wallis, Esq., to be legal vice-consul in her Majesty's Consular Court at Cairo.X

Born: ST Michael's parish, York, Yorks., England 9th Jul 1821 Baptised: St. Wilfrid's R.C. Chapel, York, Yorks., England 10th Jul 1821
Died: Alexandria, Egypt 12th Jan 1888 Buried: Alexandria, Egypt 13th Jan 1888
Family:
Wallis
  formerly of Nun Ormsby

Ancestors
[ Patrilineage | Matrilineage | Earliest Ancestors | Force | Force2 | Options ]

1.
John Edward 
Wallis
(
Power
) 1821 - 1888
2.
Edward S. 
Wallis
(
Dale
) 1773 - 1844
4.
John 
Wallis
(
Prickett
) 1742 - 1826
5.
Ann 
Prickett
(
Wallis
) 1735 - post 1789
3.
Margaret 
Dale
(
Smith
,
Wallis
) 1785 - 1871
6.
Robert 
Dale
(
Brown
) 1738 - 1790
7.
Dorothy 
Brown
(
Dale
) c. 1748 - 1815

Siblings


1.
Mary Ann(e) 
Smith
(
Quin
) 1808 - post 1848
2.
William 
Smith
1809 - ante 1823
3.
Thomas Aloysius 
Smith
1810 - 1893
4.
Margaret 
Smith
(
Lamb
) 1811 - 1886
5.
Louisa 
Smith
1813 - post 1823
6.
Clare 
Wallis
(
Dodsworth
) 1818 - 1882
7.
Jane Frances (Fanny) 
Wallis
(
Pereira
) 1822 - 1854
8.
Mary 
Wallis
1823 - ante 1888
9.
Lucy 
Wallis
  (Sr Theresa of St Joseph)
1826 - 1892
10.
Rosamunda (Rose) 
Wallis
  (Sr Mary Magdelena)
1827 - 1858
11.
Sophia (Sophy) Clarinda 
Wallis
(
Therry
) 1830 - 1911

Spouses



1. St Andrews, Dublin, Ireland 9th Feb 1859
Anna Maria 
Power
(
Wallis
) 1831 - 1916

Descendants
[ Options ]

a.
Anna Maria 
Power
(
Wallis
) 1831 - 1916
1.
Frances (Fanny) Clarinda 
Wallis
c. 1860 - 1863
2.
Sir John Edward Power 
Wallis
(
Fowke
) 1861 - 1946
2a.
Dorothea (Little Dora) Margaret 
Fowke
(
Wallis
) 1883 - 1930
2.1.
hidden
...
2.2.
hidden
...
2.3.
Joan 
Wallis
1907 - 1936
2.4.
hidden
...
2.5.
Edward Louis 
Wallis
(
Sanderson
) 1910 - 1962
3.
Mary Lucy (Lucy) 
Wallis
1863 - 1949
4.
Robert Edmund 
Wallis
1865 - 1942
5.
Francis (Frank) Joseph 
Wallis
1866 - 1896
6.
Mgr Canon George Henry 
Wallis
1873 - 1950
Sources

Census

Timeline


9th Jul 1821Born York, Yorks., England
10th Jul 1821Baptised York, Yorks., England
1841Member of household in 1841 census (census) England
8th Jul 1842Became an heir of
Edward S. 
Wallis
(
Dale
) 1773 - 1844 (will)
31st Mar 1851Lodger in 1851 census (census) Liverpool, Lancs., England
27th Jun 1854Became an heir of
Elizabeth 
Wallis
1777 - 1857 (will)
8th Feb 1859MARS/ROLE FIANCE
9th Feb 1859Married
Anna Maria 
Power
(
Wallis
) 1831 - 1916 Dublin, Ireland
1861Head of household in 1861 census (census) England
3rd Apr 1871Head of household in 1871 census (census) England
c. 1871Executor of the will of
Margaret 
Dale
(
Smith
,
Wallis
) 1785 - 1871 (will)
12th Jan 1888Died Alexandria, Egypt
13th Jan 1888Buried Alexandria, Egypt
16th Feb 1888AACT/ROLE DEAD
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