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Edward Napleton 
Jennings
1825 - post 1856


Edward Napleton 
Jennings
, of Adelaide, S. Aus. In Melbourne ca 1856. http://www.headington.org.uk/oxon/mayors/1836_1962/randall_thomas_1859 .htm "In 1848, an undergraduate called Edward Napleton Jennings was arrested as a bankrupt, with debts of well over £2,000. When asked why he had allowed Jennings to run up a debt of £70 without knowing his address or contacting his father, Randall replied that any Oxford trader who did this would be boycotted and thus forced to shut up shop. In 1848 Randall published a pamphlet, Oxford tradesmen versus the insolvent Jennings: a verbatim copy of the schedule of Edward Napleton Jennings: Discharged under the Insolvent Act, December 31st, 1847." "Oxford tradesmen versus the insolvent Jennings: a verbatim copy of the schedule of Edward Napleton Jennings: Discharged under the insolvent act, December 31st, 1847 " Maitland Mercury 5 August 1848 Messenger, Feb. 14. j College Life at Oxford.-A Warning. At the Insolvent Debtors' Court, London, a short time ago, the temptations to extravagance to which young men, on entering the University at Oxford, are exposed, were strikingly exhibited in the case of an insolvent named Edward Napleton Jennings, the son of a Yorkshire clergyman, and an under-graduate. His debts amounted to £2,000, and he was opposed by Mr. Dowse, on behalf of several creditors, all tradesmen of Oxford. From the insolvent's own statement, it appeared that he went to Qxford in 1845, his father making him an allowance of £250 a year. No fewer than fifty tradesmen waited on bim at his chambers the first week after his arrival at the University, and all pressed him for his custom, offered him almost unlimited credit. He had accordingly been tempted to avail himself of the opportunities of indulgence placed before him, and had not only run up enormous bills with hatters, tailors, drapers, horse dealers, wine merchants, confec- tioners, jewellers, and others, but had obtained advances from money lenders, who gave him £55 upon £200 bills, thereby reserving no less than £145 for interest, &c, supposing the bills were ever paid. The system of the tradesmen was strongly reprehended by the Commissioner (Phillips), and the insolvent, after a severe lec- ture on his extravagance, by which he had blighted his own propects, and ruined the ex- pectations, and alienated the affections, of his father, was discharged. He had previously been in prison six months.-Leeds Mercury.

Born: 1825Baptised: Great Driffield, Yorks., , England 1st May 1825
Died: post 1856Buried:
Family:
Jennings

Ancestors
[ Patrilineage | Matrilineage | Earliest Ancestors | Force | Force2 | Set Relationship | Relationship | Options ]

1.
Edward Napleton 
Jennings
1825 - post 1856
2.
Rev. Henry 
Jennings
(
Dickinson
) ante 1805 - post 1825
 
 
3.
Harriet 
Dickinson
(
Jennings
)
6.
 

Siblings


1.
Harriett M. 
Jennings
1823 - post 1901

Spouses




Descendants
[ Options ]

a. ?
1.
Agatha Harriot 
Jennings
(
Dalton
) 1851 - 1915
1a.
Rev. Norcliffe 
Dalton
(
Jennings
) 1854 - 1911
1.1.
Norcliffe Napleton 
Dalton
1881 - 1881
1.2.
Violet Mary Agatha 
Dalton
1882 - 1944
1.3.
Joan Neville E. 
Dalton
1883 - post 1911
1.4.
Isabel Frances 
Dalton
1885 - post 1911
1.5.
John Henry Norcliffe 
Dalton
(
Romaine
) 1889 - 1939 ...
1.6.
Irene Albinia 
Dalton
(
Renwick
) 1892 - post 1919
2.
Mary 
Jennings
1860 - post 1901
Sources

Timeline


1st May 1825Baptised Great Driffield, Yorks., England
1825Born
post 1856Died
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