< A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z >
Edmund (Beau) 
Power
1767 - 1837


Edmund (Beau) 
Power
, Only son. They moved from Knockbrit to Clonmel ca 1796/7. The Clonmel house was a small building near the bridge leading to the adjoining county of Waterford, at Suir island. Madden says when he arrived in Clonmel, "he was a corn merchant and butter buyer. He subsequently became proprietor of the Clonmel Gazette (or Munster mercury). The politics of the paper were liberal - Catholic politics - Power was a catholic, though not a very strict or observant one. The paper adviocated the electionbeering interests of the Llandaff or Mathew family. Bernard Wright was the editor of the paper." Of Curragheen & Clonea in Clonmel, co. Waterford, and Knockbrit near Clonmel, co. Tipperary (1797), Ireland, Magistrate, editor of the Clonmel Gazette and Munster Mercury, Newspaper Proprietor (with Lord Donoughmore). In 1807, he was tried for murder, and although acquitted, was declared unfit for the office of magistrate and was expunged from the roll. J.P. for the counties of Waterford and Tipperary. One source states: she comes from the family of Powers of Bawnfune south of Clonmel on the Tipperary and Waterford border." "Suir Island, in Clonmel" may have been the family home. Captain Boycott's superior officer harrassing tenants, a notorious dissolute, etc.. [this sentence cannot be correct, since Capt. Boycott was acting in the 1870s] [The term boycott was coined in 1880 by the Irish Home Rule leader Charles Stewart Parnell to describe the version of ostracism being used against a certain Captain Charles Cunningham Boycott by his Irish neighbors. The captain was a much-hated overseer for Lord Erne, an absentee landlord in County Mayo. In 1880, when Boycott refused to lower rents for the tenants, an audacious scheme was hatched. Servants no longer worked in his hourse, stores sold him nothing, no mail was delivered, and laborers refused to bring in the harvest. Boycott imported politically friendly (that is, Protestant) laborers from the county of Ulster but the expenses of doing so proved disastrous. A humiliated Boycott was forced to leave Ireland in disgrace. The campaign's success galvanized Ireland. Landlords who evicted tenants suddenly found that no other family would move into the vacated home. ] p.278 Michael Sadleir book 1840 To her relatives she was uniformly generous. After her father died in 1837 (he was seventy years old, "unable to make the slightest movement without screeching with agony", yet to the last night of his life draining the four tumblers of punch to which he had grown accustomed) she continued to support her youngest sister (the Countess Saint Marsault) and for a while her brother Robert also. Owing to her influence with Lord Durham, Robert Power was at last given a post in Canada, and presumably her budget was thereafter relieved of the cost of keeping his family)..." Is this to do with him? "1837 KILSHEELAN a parish, partly in the barony of Upperthird, county of Waterford, but chiefly in that of Iffa and Offa East, County of Tipperary, and province of Munster, 5 miles W.N.W. from Carrick-on-Suir, on the road from Clonmel to Waterford; containing 1531 inhabitants, of which number, 283 are in the county of Waterford. The village comprises 57 houses and 290 inhabitants, and is a constabulary police station. Here is a bridge over the river Suir. The principal seats are Newtown Anner, the residence of Lady Osborne; Landscape, of _ Congreve, Esq.; and Gurteen, of E. Power, Esq., of which only the stables are yet built. Adjoining the magnificent woods of the demesne, which contains a cromlech, is a large ravine composed of strata of red sandstone, white silicious sandstone, and soft slatey rock, which decomposes into a pure yellow ochreous earth. It is a vicarage, in the diocese of Lismore, united to the rectory of Kilmurry, and in the gift of the Marquess of Ormonde, in whom the rectory is impropriate. The tithes amount to 380.11.11, of which 250.7.2 is payable to the vicar, and the remainder to the improprietor; the tithes of the benefice amount to 754.19.1. In the R.C. divisions it forms part of the union or district of Kilgrant or Riverstown, and contains a chapel. About 80 children are educated in two schools, one of which is principally supported by Lady Osborne. The late W. Power, Esq., of Ballydino, left 30 acres of land and 5,000 pounds for the establishment of an almshouse, which is not yet finished. Here are some remains of the ancient church and of a castle, also a large moat. Cromlech=A circle of monoliths usually enclosing a dolmen or mound. Dolmen= A monument consisting of several megaliths arranged so as to form a chamber, usually regarded as a tomb. Megalith= One of the huge stones or boulders used in various types of prehistoric monuments Impropriate=Monastic property transferred to lay ownership. desmesne=Possession of land as one's own; An estate or land of which the owner is in possession now." and " Newtown-Lennan Civil Parish South Tipperary NGA#: 84 GV#: 113 consists of RC parishes: Carrick on Suir RC parish starts 1784 Newtownlennan consists of Ahenny Little; Athenny; Attyjames; Ballinurra; Ballybronoge; Clashnasmut; Cloghapistole; Cregg; Mainstown; Newtown Lower; Newtown Upper; Poulmaleen; Tiroe NEWTOWN-LENNAN 1837 a parish, partly in the barony of Slievardagh, and partly in that of Iffa and Offa East, county of Tipperary, and province of Munster, 2 3/4 miles N. from Carrick-on-Suir, on the high road to Kilkenny; containing 1931 inhabitants. This parish is bounded on the east by the river lennan, by which it is separated from the county of Kilkenny, and the river Suir flows within a mile of its south-eastern boundary: it comprises 5670 statute acres of good land, of which more than two-thirds are under tillage, and the remainder in pasture. The system of agriculture is improving, and there is neither waste land nor bog. That portion which is within the barony of Slievardagh is separated from the other by a chain of hills running east and west, and cultivated nearly to their summits, which are planted with trees. Limestone of the finest quality is found in great abundance, and is burnt for the supply of the country for many miles round; and in the north-eastern part of the parish are extensive slate quarries in active operation; the refuse, together with that of the limestone, is used in making and repairing the roads. There are strong indications of coal, and a few years since attempts were made to procure it, but the works were impeded by water breaking into the shafts, and were afterwards discontinued on the death of the proprietor, the late Edmond Power, Esq. Cregg, the seat of T.E. Lalor, Esq.,is a handsome residence, erected about 10 years since, and situated in tastefully disposed grounds. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Lismore, forming part of the union of Clonegam; the tithes amount to 441.9.5. In the R.C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Carrick-on-Suir: the chapel is a neat edifice in good repair. There are two private schools, in which are about 60 children. There are ruins of the churches of Newtown-Lennan and Athenry, to each of which a large cemetery is attached; in the latter are two stone crosses, with inscriptions in the Erse character." Crown Office of Clonmel: Inquest proceedings on the body of Joseph Lonnergan (shot by Edmond Power, Esq., JP, the 21st of April 1807) EP is cited as a magistrate and JP for the county of Tipperary. The Literary Life and Correspondence of the Countess of Blessington, Vol. 1,2 by MADDEN, R.R. ---------- The Times, Friday, Aug 22, 1834; pg. 1; Issue 15563; col F Ireland. Renewal Of Treble Agitation: Conservative Repeal And Banking. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.). Category: News ...seriously attacked by Edmond Power, Esq. (agent for Mr Jacob at the two Dungarvon elections), for lending his influence to teh opposing candidate, Pierse George Barron. In his later years, he moved from Clonmel to Clarendon st., Dublin.

Born: Ireland, , , 1767 Baptised:
Died: poss. 5 Lower dorset st, Dublin, Ireland 1837 Buried:
Family:
Power
  formerly of Gurteen

Ancestors
[ Patrilineage | Matrilineage | Earliest Ancestors | Force | Force2 | Options ]

1.
Edmund (Beau) 
Power
(
MacDougall
,
Sheehy
,
Vize
) 1767 - 1837
2.
Michael 
Power
c. 1748 - 1775
4.
Edmund FitzJames 
Power
(
Power
,
O'Brien
) ante 1725 - 1775
5.
Elisabeth 
Power
(
Power
) ante 1726 - 1752
   
 

Siblings


1.
F/? 
Power
(
Gleeson
)

Spouses



1.
Mary Campbell 
MacDougall
(
Power
,
Browne
,
Gardiner
) 1786 - 1814
2. c. 1788
Ellen 
Sheehy
(
Power
) ante 1766 - c. 1817
3. post 1817
F/? 
Vize
(
Hymes
,
Power
) + post 1817

Descendants
[ Options ]

a.
Ellen 
Sheehy
(
Power
) ante 1766 - c. 1817
1.
Edmond 
Power
* c. 1788
2.
Michael 
Power
c. 1788 - post 1847
3.
Anne 
Power
c. 1788 - c. 1797
4.
Margaret/Marguerita (Sally) 
Power
(
Farmer
,
Gardiner
) 1789 - 1849
5.
Ellen 
Power
(
Purves
,
Manners-Sutton
) 1792 - 1845
5a.
Capt. John Home 
Purves
(
Power
) c. 1785 - 1827
5.1.
Louisa Home 
Purves
(
Fairlie
) 1811 - 1843 ...
5.2.
Alexander Home 
Purves
* 1813
5.3.
Capt. John Home 
Purves
(
Parker
) c. 1816 - 1867 ...
5.4.
Marguerita Home 
Purves
(
Tollemache
) 1817 - 1896
5.5.
Mary Home 
Purves
ante 1818 - 1850
5.6.
Ellen Home 
Purves
(
Arkwright
) c. 1818 - 1883 ...
5b.
Charles 
Manners-Sutton
(
Denison
,
Power
) 1780 - 1845
5.7.
Frances Diana/Matilda 
Manners-Sutton
(
Astley
) 1829 - 1874 ...
5.8.
M/? 
Manners-Sutton
1831 - 1831
6.
Robert 
Power
(
Brooke
) c. 1800 - post 1847
7.
Mary Ann 
Power
(
St Marsault
) c. 1804 - post 1847
Sources

Timeline


???Married
Mary Campbell 
MacDougall
(
Power
,
Browne
,
Gardiner
) 1786 - 1814
1767Born Ireland
c. 1788Married
Ellen 
Sheehy
(
Power
) ante 1766 - c. 1817
post 1817Married
F/? 
Vize
(
Hymes
,
Power
) + post 1817
1837Died Dublin, Ireland
| Top |

Hosted by
HTML generated by
SoftLinks
, copyright © 1996 - 2017 Ben Laurie
Copyright © 1996 - 2017 Camilla von Massenbach